This Is The Main Cause of High HIV/AIDS Spread; Aids Commission Has Announced and Cautioned The Public -See Details

This Is The Main Cause of High HIV/AIDS Spread; Aids Commission Has Announced and Cautioned The Public -See Details

The Ghana AIDS Commission has revealed that sexual contacts account for 80% of HIV infections in Ghana.

According to the Commission, failing to use condoms correctly and regularly has contributed to this situation.

Dr. Kyeremeh Atuahene, Director General of the Commission, who announced this, explained that Ghanaians should understand that because the majority is through sexual contact, there is a need to protect themselves whenever they have sex.

He also indicated that sexually active persons should limit the number of sexual partners they have.

He stated that abstinence is the best method to protect yourself, but if you are unable to abstain, you should use a condom whenever you have sex with someone you are not married to.

“The constant and correct use of condoms has been a huge challenge because many people do not want to use condoms. However, if you are unable to abstain from sex and are sexually active, you should use condoms correctly and regularly. The best option is abstinence. If you are not married, you could abstain from sex until you are. However, if you are unable to refrain, you must protect yourself.”

He was speaking on Frontline on Rainbow Radio 87.5Fm with the host Kwabena Agyapong.

According to new data released by the Ghana AIDS Commission, a total of 16,574 new cases of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections were recorded in 2022.

The figure compares to a total of 18,036 infections recorded in 2021.

The 16,574 new HIV infections affected people of all ages.

Infections were recorded in 13,706 people aged 15 and up; 2,180 children aged zero to 14 years; 645 adolescents aged 10 to 19 years; and 739 young people aged 15 to 24 years.

The total number of AIDS-related deaths recorded for people of all ages was 9,359, the data added.

Adults (15+ years) were 7,179; children (0-14 years) 2,180; adolescents (10–19 years) 645 and young people (15–24 years) were 739.

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